How to Reduce Stress and Anxiety by Optimizing Performance: Global Stress Summit

April 23, 2017

I really enjoyed this guest expert interview with John Assaraf on the Global Stress Summit because it is so practical: Reducing Stress and Optimizing Performance. He developed some ideas based on following what really highly successful people do within time.


He shares this about time management:

And the first thing that I learned in research and study is, number one, there’s no such thing as time management. And so, that’s the first fallacy.

And what I discovered was that highly successful people really know how to organize and prioritize what they are committed to accomplishing in a day.

And this gem about prioritization:

When you shift your thinking to understanding that you cannot manage time, all you can get really, really good at is prioritizing what you do in time and when.

John shares that all your time management should evolve around your highest values and life’s priorities and then

how do you orchestrate your decisions into that framework so that you’re taking care of at least two or three of your highest values before 9 o’clock every morning. I get to do three of those before 9 o’clock every day, which means the rest of the day I can do all the other stuff.

He does work mostly with entrepreneurs and his talk is aimed at those with their own businesses and flexibility but I can see how some of it could be tweaked and also applied to anyone.

If time management is a nightmare for you and you don’t feel you have enough hours in the day then this interview is well worth tuning in to! You may just find that by applying some of the concepts that you are able to reduce your stress levels and anxiety!

If you’d like to hear more from John Assaraf and the other fascinating speakers tune in to the Global Stress Summit, which is online from April 24 – May1, 2017

John’s inteview interview airs on day 4.

Your host, Dr. Heidi Hanna, began her expedition into the world of stress science at the early age of 12 when she began to suffer from debilitating anxiety, depression, and panic attacks. With no medical explanation, she was forced to dive into mind-body research to try to put the puzzle pieces together.

In this Global Stress Summit, Dr. Hanna interviews the very pioneering researchers and thought leaders who helped her learn how to utilize stress as a stimulus for growth rather than a trigger for burnout and breakdown, as she passionately encourages us to do the same. Here is the registration link.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

GABA protects against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride and reduces anxiety

April 21, 2017

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is a calming amino acid that when taken as a supplement (ideally sublingually) works to relax, calm, ease anxiety and social anxiety, quiet the mind, help with sleeping challenges, reduce neck and other body tension, remove uneasiness and worry, and give hope.

It’s one of the main amino acids I use with my anxious clients and they see great results. We are seeing more and more research that this amino acid does work and yet I still get weekly questions about GABA: “I’ve been told it won’t work unless I have a leaky blood brain barrier.” This is a myth I’m trying to dispel and cover this topic in great detail in my GABA talk on the last Anxiety Summit.

GABA also protects against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride

Because of all this I’m always excited to see new research on the benefits of GABA and this recent study is no exception. It was an animal study and the authors report that GABA also protects against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride: γ-Aminobutyric acid ameliorates fluoride-induced hypothyroidism in male Kunming mice.

The mice that were injected with sodium fluoride were found to have decreased blood levels of T4, T3 and thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG) and damage to the thyroid:

fluoride intoxication induced structural abnormalities in thyroid follicles.

The fluoride-exposed mice that were subsequently treated with GABA were found to have improved results for T4, T3 and thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG levels) and healing of the structural abnormalities in thyroid follicles that were observed after fluoride exposure.

The authors conclude with this statement, reporting that GABA acted as a natural antioxidant:

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to establish the therapeutic efficacy of GABA as a natural antioxidant in inducing thyroprotection against fluoride-induced toxicity.

If you can’t get access to GABA, a paper published earlier this year reports similar results with taurine, an amino acid that promotes GABA production: Taurine Ameliorates Renal Oxidative Damage and Thyroid Dysfunction in Rats Chronically Exposed to Fluoride.

Added to our water supplies, fluoride affects the thyroid

Although this post is about GABA I recognize that I also have to address the fluoride aspect which I know is a controversial topic! We all know that fluoride has been added to our water supplies in an attempt to try and prevent tooth decay. Izabella Wentz, author of the new book Hashimoto’s Protocol, writes about what she calls the Fluoride Conspiracy:

However, most people don’t know that fluoride was used as an antithyroid drug that suppressed thyroid activity in people with overactive thyroids before the invention of antithyroid drugs.

A dose of 2 to 5 mg per day was typically found to be effective for suppressing an overactive thyroid. If you’re following directions and drinking your eight cups of water each day, chances are, you are taking in enough fluoride to suppress your thyroid if you live in the typical fluoridated community!

While most Westernized countries have rightfully rejected fluoridation without any apparent consequences on tooth decay, the United States, Canada, and parts of the UK continue to fluoridate their water.

In research that was way overdue, a 2015 British study reported that medical practices in a fluoridated area of the UK (West Midlands vs. those in a nonfluoridated area, Greater Manchester) were twice as likely to report a high prevalence of hypothyroidism in their patients! Furthermore, analysis of different parts of the UK found that the rates of hypothyroidism were statistically matched to the rates of fluoride in the local water supply!

Medications and other sources of fluoride

Izabella also lists some of the most commonly used medications that contain fluoride in this blog post: Fluoride And Your Thyroid

  • Prozac®, Lexapro®, Celexa®, Paxil®: used for depression, anxiety, or OCD
  • Prevacid®: used for acid reflux
  • Diflucan®: an antifungal used for yeast infections.
  • Fluoroquinolone antibiotics (Cipro®, Levaquin®, Avelox®): used for UTIs and other infections
  • Celebrex®: used for pain
  • Lipitor®, Zetia®: used to lower cholesterol

Other common sources of fluoride are fluoridated toothpastes and dental preparations, processed beverages and foods, pesticides, tea, mechanically deboned meat, Teflon pans and exposure in the workplace. You can read more about these sources from The Fluoride Action Network (FAN), an organization that seeks to broaden awareness about the toxicity of fluoride compounds among citizens, scientists, and policymakers alike.

The GABA and taurine hypothyroid-fluoride research is too new to have made it into Izabella’s book but since anxiety is a common symptom in hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and based on this research, using either GABA or taurine shows promise for helping both the thyroid to heal after fluoride exposure (via water, medications, diet or workplace exposure) AND to help reduce the physical anxiety symptoms.

It seems to be a two-way street because we’ve always known that the amino acids will be effective for addressing low GABA and low serotonin levels ONLY when thyroid health is optimal (and not many people are aware of this).

I also can’t help but wonder if a small amount of GABA (or taurine) wouldn’t be helpful after known exposure to fluoride sources and certainly while you are working to reduce fluoride exposure – even if hypothyroidism is not a problem. I look forward to future research in this area.

If you’d like an overview of how I use GABA and the other amino acids with my clients you can read all about it here.

I’d love to hear if you have observed an improvement in thyroid health since using GABA for your anxiety? And how dedicated you are to avoid fluoride?

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Food Mood Expert Trudy Scott is a certified nutritionist on a mission to educate and empower anxious individuals worldwide about natural solutions for anxiety, stress and emotional eating.

antianxiety food solutionTrudy is the author of The Antianxiety Food Solution: How the Foods You Eat Can Help You Calm Your Anxious Mind, Improve Your Mood and End Cravings and host of The Anxiety Summit now in its 4th season and called a “bouquet of hope.”

Trudy is passionate about sharing the powerful food mood connection because she experienced the results first-hand, finding complete resolution of her anxiety and panic attacks.

Mindd International Forum 2017, Sydney, Australia

April 21, 2017

The Mindd Forum Practitioner Training 2017 runs 20-21 May, 2017 at University of New South Wales, Sydney.

It will focus on brain-immuno-gut health in children and women, covering case studies, pre-natal care and women’s health (healthy mothers lead to better healthcare outcomes for the whole family). Here are some of the speakers/topics:

  • Robyn Cosford: Herbs in treating PANDAS
  • Rachel Arthur, ND: Getting your bearings regarding the pregnant thyroid – for mum and baby
  • Christine Houghton: Nutrigenomics in Treating Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Dr Nirala Jacobi, BHSc, ND (USA): Diagnosis and treatment of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
  • Dr Christabelle Yeoh: Microbial energy economics- our mitochondria
  • John Smartt: Osteopathic treatment for improving the gut function of people with brain-gut conditions

Masterclass training will feature the power of combining Functional Nutrition and Functional Neurology with expert clinician Brandon Brock MSN, BSN, RN.

Dr. Brock has a passion for lecturing and giving learners didactic and academic skills in a way that is easy to digest, comprehend and utilize in a clinical setting. He has developed over 5000 hours of curriculum pertaining to neurology, nutrition, physical diagnosis, pharmacology, immunology, endocrinology and students of all from multiple educational backgrounds, including medical doctors, nurse practitioners and chiropractors

In his Mindd Masterclass Dr Brock will cover how to assess and treat a range of brain-immuno-gut conditions including ASD, ADHD, OCD, Anorexia, LD, SPD, CFS, PANDAS, Tic-Borne Illness and more.

Topics that Dr Brock will cover:

  • Is it gut-brain or brain-gut?
  • Nutrition and blood sugar impact on the brain
  • Hyper kinetic disorders (ADHD, OCD, TICS)
  • Brain – immune interactions (brain autoimmunity)
  • Impact of infections on the brain (strep, mycoplasm, tic-borne)
  • Understanding the vagus nerve and vestibular system

Details and registration for MINDD Forum 2017 here. This is a practitioner-only training and I will share highlights afterwards.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

NANP 2017 Bonnie Fisk-Hayden Student Scholarship Recipients

April 20, 2017

Bonnie Fisk Hayden, Frances Holmes and myself at the NANP conference in 2011. This was the last conference Bonnie attended and I have great memories of a wonderful event with her.

Each year the National Association of Nutrition Professionals (NANP) has an annual conference to discuss the latest research and methodologies in the field of nutrition. With the NANP conference around the corner in May, it is time to acknowledge the recipients of the 2017 Bonnie Fisk-Hayden Student Scholarship. This scholarship originated after the passing of my dear friend Bonnie Fisk-Hayden in August of 2011 from autoimmune hepatitis. She was not only a dear friend, but we both shared the passion of nutrition. We met in 2004 at the first NANP conference and chatted voraciously all weekend.

These pictures are from our walk down to the beach at that very first NANP conference in 2004. It was held at the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Marin Headlands

We continued to share, encourage and support each other from then onwards. We would meet for walks, lunches and at conferences around the country, and spend hours on the phone discussing new books, new research and anything food and nutrition-related.  She even gave me constructive feedback when I presented at a big Las Vegas conference and read my book The Antianxiety Food Solution cover to cover before publication, offering input and encouragement.

Bonnie was an amazingly passionate nutritionist who went back to nutrition school when she was in her 60s. She was very active in the NANP and served as a director on the board, headed up the Publications committee and helped design the conference program and other NANP materials (she was a very talented graphic artist too!) Bonnie once said, “joining the NANP as a student was one of the best things I did for my nutrition business.” 

I decided to offer a student scholarship the following year. It felt like a really good thing to do to honor Bonnie’s influence and dedication to the NANP.  In 2012 and 2013 one student scholarship was offered and this has now grown to 3 students being been awarded the Bonnie Fisk-Hayden Student Scholarship, thanks to two anonymous donors (who are appreciated). 

The 2017 recipients of the scholarship are: Johanna Setta, Rajesh Shah, and Celeste Burrows.  I know Bonnie is smiling and cheering them on!

Johanna Setta

Johanna is a student at Bauman College and will be graduating this year. As a Food Access Coordinator for a small community hospital, Johanna has played an integral role in Northwest Vermont food systems and primary food focused prevention. Health Care Without Harm has recently elected Johanna as the Healthy Food in Health Care Ambassador for the state of Vermont. 

Helping folks take their health into their own hands through whole foods and mental health has been Johanna’s life mission. Johanna is “eager to attend the NANP conference to network with other like-minded individuals and glean any cutting edge knowledge and resources.”

 

Rajesh Shah

Rajesh believes Holistic Nutrition plays a vital role in the healing and treatment of chronic illness and disease. After having completed two B.S. degrees in Engineering and an MBA, Rajesh decided to follow his true calling and embark on an MS in Holistic Nutrition at ACHS. Rajesh states “I am driven not only by my passion for wellness and for deeper knowledge, but also by a desire to use my gifts to help people eat and live better.”

In 2009, Rajesh became a Registered Yoga Teacher and ever since has been teaching weekly yoga classes in his hometown of Louisville, KY. Through Rajesh’s yoga practice and through leading others, Rajesh has witnessed the positive effects on the mind and body. In late 2016, Rajesh also began performing Nutritional Counseling with a number of clients whose goals range from weight management to cancer prevention. Rajesh believes the student scholarship will be instrumental in helping to achieve his goal of inspiring people through mindful eating and healthy living.

 

Celeste Burrows

Celeste began following nutrition and alternative medicine back in the 1970’s and was inspired by the conferences (mostly NHF) she attended then. Celeste is now a student at Bauman College and will be graduating in 2018. Celeste has witnessed the health of her older friends and associates decline rapidly from preventable causes and their treatments and medications. This observation and her desire to gain credibility led to Celeste’s decision to return to school to pursue nutrition consulting as a profession.

Celeste is involved in the Village movement (supporting seniors who want to age in their own homes) and is an active member of Ashby Village. Celeste helped with the development of the Healthier Aging Initiative where she plans to provide a series of talks on Nutrition for Healthy Aging as well as consultations with individuals.

Celeste is eager to attend the NANP conference because “I expect it will provide a good immersion in the culture and practice of nutrition consulting, and a valuable three days spent with leaders in the field, fellow nutritional consultants, and vendors.”

I’d also love to acknowledge my dear friend Frances Holmes  pictured above with Bonnie and I. She knew Bonnie well and was such a comfort to me after Bonnie’s passing and her work is so fitting for those who have suffered a loss. Frances is a Certified Nutrition Consultant who has combined her real life experiences of grief and loss with her nutritional knowledge to create a recipe for balancing the somatic aspects of grief with nutrition. Her training as an Integrative Grief Practitioner and in Yoga for Grief Relief provide additional tools for managing the body centered effects of grief.

With skillful communication Frances offers simple pragmatic tools to assist in choosing foods that nourish, ground and promote well-being. She specializes in helping the bereaved address the accompanying emotional mood swings related to loss of any kind. She is passionate about assisting her clients make the connection between what they eat and how they feel.

And thanks to Susan Yuen, MS, for helping me gather this information into a blog!

If you’d like to join the collaborative community of holistic nutrition professionals, students, educators, and organizations, gathered together to learn and share how we can positively impact today’s healthcare delivery system you can find details and registration information here. This is a practitioner-only event and runs May 4-7, 2017 in Portland, Oregon.

Congratulations to all of the recipients of the Bonnie Fisk-Hayden Student Scholarship!  Enjoy the conference and wonderful opportunities that the NANP offers.  I wish you well and look forward to hearing how you continue to have an impact in the nutrition world! 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

Autism, anxiety and the gut: Microbiota transfer therapy or fecal microbiota transplant

April 17, 2017

We know that one of your greatest ally in health is your microbiome – the trillions of bacteria that are the control center of your health! But sometimes your microbiome can actually cause problems. One way to improve the microbiome is via microbiota transfer therapy (MTT), also called fecal microbiota transplant (FMT).  

I was recently interviewed by Dr. Raphael Kellman for the Microbiome Medicine Summit 2 (it starts May 8) and shared newly published research on this approach – Microbiota Transfer Therapy alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms: an open-label study

Here are some of the details of this very promising research:

  • It was a small study on children 6 to 7 years old
  • They were given antibiotics for 2 weeks
  • They were given a bowel cleanse
  • They were given an extended fecal microbiota transplant. This was a high initial dose followed by daily and lower maintenance doses for 7–8 weeks.
  • By the end of treatment and 80% reduction of gastrointestinal symptoms were seen. This included: constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, and abdominal pain.
  • These gastrointestinal symptoms improvements persisted for 8 weeks after treatment.
  • They also saw behavioral autism spectrum disorder symptoms improve significantly and remain improved 8 weeks after treatment ended. These symptoms included irritability, hyperactivity, lethargy and socialization

During the interview Dr. Kellman asked what bacterial changes were observed and I didn’t have the study on hand. I looked it up after the interview and this is what they report

Specifically, overall bacterial diversity and the abundance of Bifidobacterium, Prevotella, and Desulfovibrio among other taxa increased following MTT, and these changes persisted after treatment stopped (followed for 8 weeks).

Also

following MTT, the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium significantly increased fourfold and became comparable to its relative abundance in neurotypical children

They conclude that the MTT

shifted gut microbiota of children with ASD toward that of neurotypical children … consistent with the hypothesis that gut microbiota may be at least partially responsible for GI and ASD symptoms

Research just published last month reports similar results with digestive issues and anxiety. Germ-free mice were given the fecal microbiota from healthy control individuals or IBS patients with diarrhea, with or without anxiety. They found that the microbiota profiles in the mice matched the microbiota profiles of the human donors, affecting their digestive function and anxiety levels! I’ll share more on this study in a future blog post.

I hope you’ll join us on the Microbiome Medicine Summit 2, May 8-15, 2017 to learn more

Your host, Dr. Raphael Kellman, has seen the profound healing power of microbiome medicine and how it can address many diseases.

Learn the lessons and methodologies of microbiome medicine – it could improve your health, longevity, vitality and assist with unresolved problems!

It can enhance your brain function, improve mood, reduce anxiety and depression; and address gastrointestinal illnesses, including IBS, Crohn’s and colitis; counter newly identified GI/brain syndromes; and address autism and autoimmune diseases at the root cause!

I thoroughly enjoyed my interview with Dr. Kellman and look forward to hearing all the other great interviews. You can find details and registration here

I hope you can join us!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

Anxiety, depression, GABA and cortisol: effects of Lactobacillus ingestion

April 14, 2017

We now know that good bacteria or probiotics have the potential to alter brain chemistry and have an impact on anxiety and depression. You may recall my interview with Professor Ted Dinan on a prior Anxiety Summit – Microbes in the gut and psychobiotics as a potential treatment for anxiety and depression. He shared his paper and this definition of Psychobiotics: a novel class of psychotropic.

…we define a psychobiotic as a live organism that, when ingested in adequate amounts, produces a health benefit in patients suffering from psychiatric illness. As a class of probiotic, these bacteria are capable of producing and delivering neuroactive substances such as gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin, which act on the brain-gut axis.

Research published by Dinan, Cryan and their teams also found benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on stress, anxiety and depression type behaviors in mice. This is older research (published in 2011) but it’s the first time I’ve shared it on the blog. I talk about this paper in the upcoming Microbiome Medicine 2 Summit so I like to share study excerpts and links to the study.

The write up in Science Daily is a good one – Mind-Altering Microbes: Probiotic Bacteria May Lessen Anxiety and Depression

…mice fed with Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 showed significantly fewer stress, anxiety and depression-related behaviours than those fed with just broth. Moreover, ingestion of the bacteria resulted in significantly lower levels of the stress-induced hormone, corticosterone.

The part that I find fascinating is the effects of Lactobacillus on GABA receptors in the brain (GABA is your main calming neurotransmitter):

The researchers also showed that regular feeding with the Lactobacillus strain caused changes in the expression of receptors for the neurotransmitter GABA in the mouse brain, which is the first time that it has been demonstrated that potential probiotics have a direct effect on brain chemistry in normal situations.

In this paper the authors discuss the vagus nerve and the three-way communication:

…the vagus nerve is the main relay between the microbiome (bacteria in the gut) and the brain. This three way communication system is known as the microbiome-gut-brain axis and these findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the communication between the gut and the brain, and suggest that certain probiotic organisms may prove to be useful adjunct therapies in stress-related psychiatric disorders.

What is even more fascinating is this:

the neurochemical and behavioral effects were not found in vagotomized mice

What does this mean? When the researchers severed the vagus nerve in the test mice – removing the communication between the gut and the brain – they found that the behaviors and stress hormone levels reverted back to the way they had been i.e. the vagotomized mice were more anxious, more stressed, more depressed and had higher corticosterone levels.

You can find the abstract of the paper here: Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in a mouse via the vagus nerve.

What does this mean for you? It means that good bacteria in your diet could well improve your anxiety and depression symptoms and even have an impact on your adrenals and cortisol levels. This could be in the form of a good probiotic and should always include fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, yogurt and kefir (if dairy is tolerated), water kefir (if dairy is not tolerated).

Have you observed an improvement in your anxiety and stress levels since adding a probiotic or fermented foods into your diet?

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

The definition of stress and why we need it: Global Stress Summit

April 12, 2017

I really enjoyed this interview between Dr. Heidi Hanna, host of the Global Stress Summit and guest expert Dr. Susan Peirce Thompson, author of Bright Line Eating: The Science of Living Happy, Thin & Free.

Dr. Heidi Hanna starts by asking what the definition of stress is, first sharing her definition:

What’s so crazy is if you look at that same textbook, depending on who wrote it, you can find a thousand different definitions for what stress actually is. And I think one of the things that you and I also, without knowing, really connect on is this idea that stress is not necessarily bad. My definition of stress is what happens when demand exceeds capacity. So that doesn’t have to be bad.

When we feel like we don’t have the resources we need to adapt appropriately, there’s a tension that exists. And that can actually help us grow. Or it can wear us out.

Dr. Susan likes this definition and I do too:stress is what happens when demand exceeds capacity.” Dr. Susan goes on to say we actually need stress – all of the meaningful things in life come with stress (success, love, marriage etc.) – and how she can handle high stress because she keeps her support really high:

And I personally prefer to run high stress. I just do. I like activity. I like engagement. I like meaning. I like to stay active. I just do. So I’ve learned that I just need to keep my support really high.

And that makes my days really, really full. I’m an extrovert so I like a lot of human connection. And so for me, staying in touch with my friends on the phone is one of the best ways that I can manage my stress, just process it, process it, process it. Get enough sleep. I eat immaculately.

You put those things together. And you’re good to go. I can shoulder a lot of stress.

Later on in the interview Dr. Susan emphasizes the self-care aspect, to know how much you need and why it should be as automatic as brushing your teeth twice a day:

We all should be taking exquisite care of ourselves. Some of us just don’t get away with it when we don’t though, whether it’s because we’re highly sensitive or because we’re addictive.

For me, the consequences of not taking care of myself are really high. So I get the bounty of, therefore, meditating every morning and hopefully getting a good night’s sleep and having a wonderful support network.

But it’s definitely worth it to know what kind of person you are and to build up your self-care regimen accordingly, for sure.

….You want to be executing your self-care habits like you brush your teeth.

Dr. Susan also covers the stress and sugar addiction connections and how some of us have brains that are susceptible to the addictive pull of sugar and how some of us have brains that are just not affected.

And as a society, we need to understand. Sugar is more addictive than nicotine, more addictive than cocaine.

She shares interesting information about how a third of the population will say “Oh yeah. I don’t think that’s true. I can take a cookie or leave it alone” because that’s the percentage that doesn’t experience that addictive pull at all. And how two-thirds of the population do experience that addictive pull – there are one third who experience it mildly and then the other third find the addictive pull of sugar and carbs to be very severe.

If you’d like to hear more from Dr. Susan Peirce Thompson, tune in to the Global Stress Summit, which is online from April 24 – May1, 2017

Your host, Dr. Heidi Hanna, began her expedition into the world of stress science at the early age of 12 when she began to suffer from debilitating anxiety, depression, and panic attacks. With no medical explanation, she was forced to dive into mind-body research to try to put the puzzle pieces together. In this Global Stress Summit, Dr. Hanna interviews the very pioneering researchers and thought leaders who helped her learn how to utilize stress as a stimulus for growth rather than a trigger for burnout and breakdown, as she passionately encourages us to do the same. Here is the registration link.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

Why green spaces in cities are good for grey matter, stress and anxiety

April 12, 2017
Central Park in New York City

Central Park in New York City

I love all research that support green space and nature for anxiety and stress reduction. And I’m thrilled to see this taking a front seat in cities where people often have less access to greenery!   A great example is the beautiful   Central Park in New York City.

New research is reviewed in this report in Science Daily: Why green spaces in cities are good for grey matter

Walking between busy urban environments and green spaces triggers changes in levels of excitement, engagement and frustration in the brain, a study of older people has found.

Researchers at the Universities of York and Edinburgh say the findings have important implications for architects, planners and health professionals as we deal with an aging population.

The volunteers experienced beneficial effects of green space and preferred it, as it was calming and quieter, the study revealed.

Dr Chris Neale, Research Fellow, from the University of York’s Stockholm Environment Institute, said: “There are concerns about mental wellbeing as the global population becomes older and more urbanised.”

“Urban green space has a role to play in contributing to a supportive city environment for older people through mediating the stress induced by built up settings.”

You can read the study abstract here – Older People’s Experiences of Mobility and Mood in an Urban Environment: A Mixed Methods Approach Using Electroencephalography (EEG) and Interviews.

Personally I need greenery and nature and thrive on it!

How important is greenery for you? Especially if you’re a city person?