Jeffrey Smith on Anxiety, depression, GMOs and Roundup on the Anxiety Summit

October 24, 2014

Jeffrey Smith, non-GMO advocate, founder of Institute for Responsible Technology, producer of the movie Genetic Roulette, is speaking on the Anxiety Summit. Our topic: “Anxiety & Depression: Health Risks of GMOs and Roundup.” We also talk about GM tryptophan and why it was removed from the market. It was a fabulous interview!

Here is an outline of what we cover:

  • GMO definition, health effects and why advocate a complete ban
  • The sad story of the South African GM corn/mielie farmer – this is a powerful story
  • How Bt toxins damage the gut and become “pesticide producing factories” – this is scary and sounds like a futuristic movie
  • How Roundup affects serotonin production, detoxification and the gut – more on this below in the snippet and video preview
  • Roundup’s new scary use – I had no idea!
  • The GM tryptophan disaster in 1989 – and the theory as to why tryptophan was banned
  • The good news and how you can help bring about change – there is light at the end of the tunnel!

I brought up South Africa during the interview because I was recently there. GMOs are labeled in South which is good and bad. It’s good because you can avoid eating GM products. It’s bad because labeling was done without all the activism we are seeing here in the USA, and I feel there is less awareness about the dangers. Many people are simply consuming these products without any questioning. Here is a picture of the Knorrox label.

knorox pic 1

knorox-ingredients

In this close-up picture, you’ll notice a few things. As well as the label “contains genetically modified materials” i.e. the maize/corn), it also contains:

Getting back to my interview with Jeffrey…he shared the sad story of the South African GM corn/mielie/maize farmer that had a happy ending and he assured me that awareness is growing.

We also talked extensively about how Roundup affects serotonin production, detoxification and the gut.

Here is a snippet from our actual interview we did for the summit:

Roundup shuts down this pathway called the shikimate pathway. Monsanto bragged up-and-down because Roundup blocks the shikimate pathway in order to kill weeds. And because humans don’t have the shikimate pathway, they said Roundup must be safe for humans.

But it’s not safe for a lot of reasons.

It’s an endocrine disruptor. It can promote cancer. It’s linked to heart disease and diabetes. But what they failed to point out was that the shikimate pathway is what our gut bacteria use to produce the vast majority of the l-tryptophan that we assimilate. L-tryptophan is a precursor to melatonin, which is linked to sleep and circadian rhythms, daily cycles, but it’s also a precursor to serotonin and now we land squarely on the world of anxiety. Without sufficient serotonin there can be anxiety and depression.

I managed to nab Jeffrey for a quick preview in August – this snippet in itself is enlightening – he shares more on the shikimate pathway and low serotonin. I always learn from Jeffrey and his energy and passion is amazing! Just watch him in action doing this unprepared on-the-fly interview. Sorry about the background buzz – we were at an event and I couldn’t miss the opportunity to have Jeffrey inspire you.

This is all very timely with October being Non-GMO month, a month of awareness created by the Non-GMO Project, a non-profit organization, offering North America’s only third party verification and labeling for non-GMO (genetically modified organism) food and products.

I hope you’ll join us on the Anxiety Summit season 2. It runs from Nov 3-16 and you’ll learn about this and many other nutritional and natural solutions for anxiety, panic attacks, OCD and social anxiety. This is one of many great topics we’ll be sharing.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Julie Matthews fermented foods and probiotics for anxiety and depression

October 24, 2014

Julie Matthews, Certified Nutrition Consultant, author of Nourishing Hope for Autism is speaking on the Anxiety Summit. Our topic: ” Fermented foods and probiotics for anxiety and depression: The practical and the research”

Here is an outline of our interview:

  • Types of fermentations
  • Health benefits of probiotics and fermentations
  • Research on probiotics and anxiety/depression/brain health/autism
  • Probiotic supplements
  • Prebiotics and why some people can’t use them
  • Who might have trouble with fermented foods and why
  • Steps and tips on making fermented foods and beverages

And here are 3 snippets from our interview:

There was a study that looked at human subjects under academic stress and the effects of fermented yogurt particularly Lactobacillus casei (European Journal of Nutrition in 2004 by a researcher named Marcos and their team). They found that the fermented yogurt was able to modulate the immune effects in the subjects that were under stress.

There was a study done by a researcher named Tillisch and published in 2013 in Gastroenterology. We know a lot about how the brain sends signals to the gut, but she explained that in the study they learned that the gut also sends signals to the brain. The researchers found that with yogurt, they found positive effects on the brain, including sensory processing and those areas associated with emotion and mood.

The nice thing about fermented food like sauerkraut is that it’s a form of food that is already partly digested, so it tends to create less gas. It also tends to be better digestible and can be higher in nutrients than the foods themselves that aren’t fermented. They can often help with supporting a good PH balance in the gut. The other nice thing about fermented foods is that you can get a lot of bacteria in a serving. Dr. Joseph Mercola recently tested some of his own homemade sauerkraut and found 10 trillion beneficial bacteria in a four to six ounce serving. So that’s a hundred times the amount of bacteria in a serving than you would find in a bottle of a high potency probiotic.

cabbage

You’ll also learn how to make your own sauerkraut in the video giveaway being offered by Julie.

So I hope you’ll join us on the Anxiety Summit season 2. It runs from Nov 3-16 and you’ll learn about this and many other nutritional and natural solutions for anxiety, panic attacks, OCD and social anxiety. This is one of many great topics we’ll be sharing.

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Eggs are ok, even the yolk!

October 17, 2014

eggs and spinach

We’re seeing more and more research showing that eggs are ok and can be part of a healthy diet. It’s about time! Myself and my fellow nutritionists/integrative doctors have been saying this for years. I even say “yes, you can eat the yolk” on the back of my business card.

Here is some of the recent research:

An article on Webmd, Egg-Rich Diet Not Harmful in Type 2 Diabetes discusses the results of a new study to be published later this month. The findings were presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting last month by Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia

The findings suggest that eating two eggs per day, 6 days a week can be a safe part of a healthy diet for people with type 2 (that’s 12 eggs a week – yeah!)

Eggs don’t have a bad effect on cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

…those in the high-egg group showed a trend toward HDL improvement

Researchers also found that eating an egg-rich diet for 3 months was linked to better appetite control, and may also provide a greater sense of feeling full.

The high-egg group also reported more enjoyment of foods, less boredom, and more satisfaction with the diet (I really like this finding!)

A paper published last month in the British Journal of Nutrition : “Cholesterol and egg intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study“  found that:

higher intake of cholesterol or eggs may not be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese populations

This interesting animal study “Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats” published in August:

demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect

It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression

Skipping breakfast can increase depression, anxiety and stress levels and eggs can be part of a healthy breakfast. This May 2014 paper “A cross-sectional investigation of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and health-behavior participation in Australian university students” found that:

For males, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast and poor sleep quality.

For females, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast, inadequate vigorous physical activity, and short or long sleep hours.

You don’t want to skip breakfast – ever! Low blood sugar can result in anxiety, mood swings, irritability and feeling easily overwhelmed, so it’s really important to get a good start to the day with good quality protein like eggs. Here is a simply yet delicious Egg Muffin recipe from Make It Paleo: Over 200 Grain-Free Recipes for Any Occasion.

We’re going to be talking more about the health and mood benefits of eggs (and animal protein) during season 2 of The Anxiety Summit. It runs from Nov 3-16 and you’ll learn about this and many other nutritional and natural solutions for anxiety, panic attacks, OCD and social anxiety. We’ll cover the research and practical solutions too.

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Egg muffin recipe from Make It Paleo

October 17, 2014

make-it-paleo

Here is a deliciously simple and quick recipe from one of my new favorite recipe books called Make It Paleo: Over 200 Grain-Free Recipes for Any Occasion, shared here with permission from one of the authors, Hayley Mason.

Low blood sugar can result in anxiety, mood swings, irritability and feeling easily overwhelmed, so it’s really important to get a good start to the day with good quality protein like eggs. And we’re seeing more and more research showing that eggs are ok, even the yolk!

Eggs Muffins

Anyone on the go will appreciate the simplicity of this recipe. These delicious little quiche-like muffins are easy to make ahead of time and grab at a moment’s notice.

Ingredients:

½ tsp coconut oil
½ medium onion chopped
1 cup broccoli, chopped
¼ green pepper, chopped
¼ red pepper, chopped
8 eggs
Salt and pepper to taste

Prep time: 10 minutes; Cook time: 18-20 minutes
Makes 4 large muffins or 8 small ones

Process:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 deg F
  2. Grease muffin tin with coconut oil
  3. Rinse and chop vegetables into ¼ inch pieces
  4. Divide vegetables evenly between muffin tins
  5. Whisk the eggs, then pour into the tins, dividing it evenly
  6. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then stir the vegetable and egg mixture briefly to evenly disperse the vegetables throughout the egg
  7. Bake the egg muffins in the oven for 18-20 minutes

Here are some pictures of my attempt at these while on my recent trip to South Africa. We were getting ready to head to the Natal midlands for an overnight trip to the cheetah breeding project and needed some healthy “padkos” (South African slang for “food for the road”) so my niece Tamara and I whipped up a few muffins just before we left for the trip.

Since raw onions were not a favorite in my sister’s family, I pre-cooked the onions in a little coconut oil. I think you could lightly steam the other veggies too if you don’t like them crunchy. It’s going to add to your prep time unless you use left-over veggies from the night before.

In our case, we didn’t have quite enough veggies so we ended up with two egg-only muffins! They were all delicious!

 

Muffin pan ready to go with an assortment of veggies: broccoli, peppers and pre-cooked onions

Muffin pan ready to go with an assortment of veggies: broccoli, peppers and pre-cooked onions

My niece Tamara helps to pour the beaten eggs into the muffin pan

My niece Tamara helps to pour the beaten eggs into the muffin pan

 

egg muffin 3

A quick peek shows the egg muffins rising nicely in the oven

 

Tamara sampling one of the egg-only muffins right out the oven

Tamara sampling one of the egg-only muffins right out the oven

Make It Paleo is a wonderful recipe book with many simple and basic recipes as well as some pretty fancy ones too. One quick caution – I do think there are rather too many desserts and baked goods featured – so be warned and keep to recipes in the front! Enjoy!

Authors Hayley and her husband Bill Staley are the dynamic cooking duo behind Primal Palate. Their lifelong passion for food and cooking has led them to write an internationally recognized blog, three bestselling Paleo cookbooks, as well as create a widely popular app and website.

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Breast Cancer Awareness: don’t be driven by fear

October 13, 2014
DrNalini Chilkov’s new book

Dr. Nalini Chilkov’s new book

October is Breast Cancer awareness month so here are 7 resources to keep you informed, hopeful and inspired to take charge of your overall health and breast health – for prevention and healing – and no more fear!

#1 Reduce stress in your life. Here is a blog post I wrote in 2010 with information from my colleague Ellyn Hilliard: 10 Unique Ways to Support You During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Reduce the stresses in your life. Calm the nervous system. Meditate, go on a walk…

Start to look at chemicals in your life. Find natural alternatives to cleaning products.

#2 Exercise to prevent cancer and have fun at the same time

up to a third of breast cancer cases in Western countries could be avoided with a nutritious diet and exercise

If exercise is a chore, find something fun to do and it will be a totally different experience

#3 Be aware that a lot of pinkwashing goes on – it’s quite awful how people are being taken advantage of. And know there is so much you can do that is healing and preventative. You can read more here: Pinkwashing for the cure (ridiculous!) or green for prevention?

Pinkwasher: (pink’-wah-sher) noun. A company or organization that claims to care about breast cancer by promoting a pink ribbon product, but at the same time produces, manufactures and/or sells products that are linked to the disease.

Helyane Waldman’s book “The Whole-Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors: A Nutritional Approach to Preventing Recurrence”

Rebecca Katz’s “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen: Nourishing, Big-Flavor Recipes for Cancer Treatment and Recovery”

#4 Ann Louise Gittleman, author of The Fat Flush Diet and Get the Sugar Out, just posted a great blog on how to become a breast health warrior

Raise your daily Vitamin D intake (D is like a hormone rather than a vitamin) to at least 1,000 – 4,000 IU to reach a level of at least 52 ng/mL. Women with serum levels at

Get the Sugar Out! Plain and simple, cancer feeds on sugar which is known to immobilize white blood cells for up to five hours.

#5 Dr Nalini Chilkov is my cancer referral source and she has a new cancer booklet called 32 Ways to OutSmart Cancer. It has beautiful back-to-basics advice about eating nourishing nutrient-dense, antioxidant- and polyphenol-rich real whole food. I especially like the section on herbs and spices and love the chapter on gratitude. Here is a yummy salmon recipe from her blog.

#6 Be hopeful and optimistic. My colleague Fran Sussman shares her journey and story of recovery from breast cancer in this article called I am a breast cancer survivor: There is hope. Fran will be offering six-week support classes for women diagnosed with breast cancer starting in December.

I’ve come through it, with great resilience and rebounding health. I feel better than ever post-breast cancer, at age 60. I am healthy; my doctors concur.

What can you do for prevention? Support your body with optimal nutrition, exercise, sleep and hydration. Use nutrition to minimize inflammation and insulin resistance.

 Acknowledge and work with your fear, but don’t be driven by it.

#7 And my final piece of advice is stated so beautifully by Fran: “Acknowledge and work with your fear, but don’t be driven by it.” Anxiety and depression is very common in people who have been diagnosed with cancer.  This is understandable, but I encourage you to look for and get support in this area too, so you are not driven by your fear.

You may need to address low GABA levels, keep your blood sugar stable with good quality protein at breakfast, support your adrenals, and drink calming carob instead of coffee.  There is so much you can do.

If you’re looking for more great resources for your healing journey, I invite you to join us on The Anxiety Summit, Nov 3-16, and learn more about nutritional and natural solutions for anxiety.  The topics our expert address will also lead to improved overall health, improved heart health and will help with cancer prevention too.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

The Natural Cures Movement with Dr. Josh Axe

October 8, 2014

NC_SidebarBanner_300x300_Attend

I love to bring you valuable content so I’m so pleased to be sharing this online event with you!

Learn secret cures to naturally heal your body from 30 unique presentations! The Natural Cures Movement includes natural remedies and treatment protocols for specific conditions like hypothyroidism, anxiety and depression, autoimmune disease, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. The home remedies and natural cures you will discover could help you begin a path to better health and disease prevention! Plus, it’s FREE and online from October 6-13. 2014.

Take your health to the next level when you join Dr. Josh Axe, founder of one of the top 25 natural health websites in the world, DrAxe.com, and author of The Real Food Diet Cookbook. It’s his mission to educate millions around the world in order to help them transform their health.

Here are a few of the incredible presenters:

Dr. Joseph Mercola, Take Control of Your Health & Insulin
Dr. Josh Axe, Natural Cures for Leaky Gut
Sayer Ji, 10 Food Medicines That Could Save Your Life
Suzy Cohen, RPh, Natural Remedies for Thyroid & Autoimmune Disease
Vani Hari, How to Cure Yourself Despite Food Companies and Your Doctor

Day3Banner

If you haven’t yet hear me present or want to hear me again, my food-mood-anxiety interview aired today (day 3) together with Marc David, Katie Wellness Mama and Lauren Geersten.

Here are a few gems from my food-mood-anxiety interview:

To raise low serotonin:

  • 5-HTP or tryptophan (amino acid supplements) taken between meals
  • Exercise, sunshine or a full spectrum lamp, and diet (quality real food and wild fish and grass-fed red meat and healthy fats!)
  • Pumpkin seeds – research shows that a functional food rich in tryptophan and zinc (made of pumpkin seeds) reduced social anxiety and helps sleep!

We didn’t get to talk about all the amino acids and brain chemical imbalances so here is a high level summary:

  • glutamine for low blood sugar
  • GABA for stress-eating/low GABA
  • tyrosine when you need a sugar or caffeine pickup/low catecholamines
  • DPA for comfort/emotional eating and low endorphins.

I love and highly recommend the eating psychology work of Marc David and I really enjoyed Katie’s talk on beautiful healthy coconut!

Here are some gems from her interview:

  • anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties and high in antioxidants
  • high in MCTs and easily digested so you don’t need bile to digest them, plus they help boost metabolism
  • she combines it with oregano oil for oil pulling/swishing in mouth
  • use it for cooking, as a body lotion, to help prevent diaper rash, as a hair detangler, as a massage oil

Register for FREE now at the following link: https://ju127.isrefer.com/go/summitreg/trudyscottcn/

Chilling out with cheetahs – using nature for stress relief, joy and pure awesomeness!

October 3, 2014

0 skye

I was recently visiting family in South Africa and promised to share pictures from our incredible trip to the Kwa Cheetah Breeding Project. My sister Woo and I decided to do the early morning 50 minute bush walk with Skye, one of the male cheetahs. All I can say is wow! What an experience!

I’ve written about how nature and exercise can help to boost mood and reduce stress and this certainly did this and more. I hope you get to enjoy some of it via my photos.

 

1_meeting skye

Here I am getting to meet Skye before we head out. And what a meeting it was – he purrs just like a kitty cat only louder and deeper! Incredible first encounter!

 

2_skyes sister comes over to say hi

Skye’s sister comes over to say hi and can I come for a walk too.

 

3_walking with woo

We took Skye for a 50 minute walk through the bush around Kwa Cheetah – or maybe he took us for a walk! At one stage he spotted his sister and bolted to say hello and I got kind of dragged behind him. Here is with the ranger and my sister Woo.

 

4 woo and skye

Woo getting to know Skye

 

4 trudy and skye

Skye has spotted a warthog in the far distance

 

6_woo and I with skye

Woo and I with Skye

 

niece and cheetah-1

After the early morning bushwalk we all got to spend the next two hours watching cheetahs being trained to run and hunt, and various other fun activities. This is my 7-year old niece in one enclosure – fearless!

 

7 kwa cheetch breeding

Of course we both highly recommend Kwa Cheetah Breeding Project: “The main goal behind the project is not to sell cheetahs to zoos or any other likewise place, but to release our cats back into the African wilderness.”

Here are some stats on why they do what they do: “The reason we are trying to do this is because there are only between seven and ten thousand cheetahs left worldwide. About two thousand cheetahs are dying every four years due to three main factors: natural predators (like lions and hyenas), humans (poaching is a big one, so is farming) and poor genetics. You can read all the stats here.

Next time you’re in South Africa, go and visit – you’ll be giving back and making a difference, and you’ll find you’ll get back so much more: joy, awe and an amazing sense of calmness!

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

Nutrients for dementia: could they help during benzodiazepine withdrawal?

September 19, 2014

Half Coconut and Flower on Bamboo Mat

Could certain nutrients help with memory and cognitive issues, and the “pseudo-dementia” symptoms so many people experience when withdrawing from benzodiazapines?

In a recent article I shared the new research on benzodiazepines being linked to increased Alzheimer’s risk and other serious concerns.

Alison, who was featured in the Boston Globe story, commented on the above blog post:

I am only 29 years old, and I developed what I refer to as pseudo-dementia once I developed a tolerance to benzodiazepines and it got worse once the drug was stopped. From what I have seen from others recovering from and in tolerance to benzodiazepines, cognitive functioning and memory can get hit hard and actually mimic dementia. I wonder if the symptoms these elders are experiencing are true Alzheimer’s, or a side effect/withdrawal effect.

This really got me thinking. She makes an excellent point. It may well be that the symptoms they are seeing in the study are a side effect/withdrawal effect, rather than true Alzheimer’s disease and may be reversible. It surprises me that the study authors have not commented on this since cognitive effects are well documented in the literature.

Here are a few examples I found:

Benzodiazepines revisited—will we ever learn?” Published in Addiction in 2011

“The review noted a series of adverse effects that continued to cause concern, such as cognitive and psychomotor impairment. In addition, dependence and abuse remain as serious problems. Despite warnings and guidelines, usage of these drugs remains at a high level.”

Benzodiazepine harm: how can it be reduced?” Published in British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology in January this year (2014)

“Adverse effects comprise sedation subjectively and cognitive and psychomotor impairment objectively. Complex skills such as driving can be compromised… Withdrawal and dependence have excited particular concern, and even polemic. Perhaps a third of long term (beyond 6 months) users experience symptoms and signs on attempting to withdraw – anxiety, insomnia, muscle spasms and tension and perceptual hypersensitivity.”

I was not able to find much in the literature on pseudo-dementia. I did see it listed on the benzo.org.uk site but not elsewhere in relation to benzodiazapines.

I did find this paper “Pseudo-dementia: A neuropsychological review” which is presumably something different (as it refers to depression/dementia). This part may be applicable: “ ‘The pseudo component’ which denotes the actual lack of the neurodegenerative dementia” and the fact that it can be reversed.

This all inspired me to do some digging on dementia. If what they are seeing in participants of the British Medical Journal is not true dementia, it’s very encouraging to think that recovery is possible.

There are some very powerful foods and nutrients that help certain people with dementia and I wonder if they would also help with the benzodiazepine-induced pseudo-dementia:

Not all of the above would work for everyone because of biochemical individuality, and there are mixed results in the literature, but it’s worth assessing for possible deficiencies and addressing overall nutrient status.

It would be wonderful to think that benzo recovery can be improved in the areas of cognition, memory and “pseudo-dementia.”

Interestingly, many of these above nutrients are also factors in anxiety and/or depression and may be related to why someone sought help and was prescribed benzos initially.

P.S. There nutrients are great for overall brain function so anyone could benefit from one or more of them. I actually take 20mg of lithium orotate a day and it helps keep my post-menopausal brain sharp and focused.

P.P.S. I have recently learned that many people in benzo withdrawal do not tolerate supplements so please USE CAUTION and work with your health practitioner.  I will do a part 2 follow up to this blog listing foods high in these nutrients in case you feel more comfortable and do better with a food based approach. 

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”