MTHFR and Methylation practitioner training by Coleen Walsh

February 23, 2015

mthfr

Confused about Methylation and MTHFR?

MTHFR is one hot topic and many clients are getting their MTHFR results, but do not know what to do.

Methylation cycle abnormalities can predispose you to disease. The MTHFR SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) is at a key position in the methylation cycle and if not working properly, can affect the whole pathway, creating symptoms and disease, including mood issues like anxiety and depression. The good news is that nutritional protocols and lifestyle modifications can help tremendously.

Online Practitioner Training

My friend and colleague, Coleen Walsh, dubbed the “methyl queen” is doing an online Practitioner Training (for Nutritionists and Healthcare Practitioners) on MTHFR and Methylation on February 28, 2015 from 10am MST – 3pm MST, so you may get a better understanding of Methylation Pathways and how to better help your clients with these SNPs

This 5-hour presentation breaks down the biochemistry of these pathways, and discusses epigenetics and holistic protocols to give you a solid understanding of the subject. 

Plus, when you purchase the event, you also will receive the recordings and 3 hours of bonus material! If you can’t make it at this day/time, you can still register and will get the materials a few days after the event.

A Bit About Coleen:

Coleen Walsh is a holistic and functional nutritionist that specializes in MTHFR and Methylation education and one on one client consultations.  She is author of the forthcoming book, “Thriving with MTHFR: A guide for the everyday mutant!”, dubbed the “Methyl Queen” by colleagues and winner of the 2014 NANP Impact Award based on her research & education on MTHFR & Methylation.  She trains and consults MDs, NDs, L.ACs, DOs and Nutritionists all over the United States and in Japan on the topic of MTHFR and Methylation and has completed hundreds of hours of additional research and education on these pathways.  Coleen suffered from many degenerative and autoimmune diseases and helped heal herself after finding out about her MTHFR status, her passion is to educate and help support others along their journey towards health.

coleen info

We met at the NANP/National Association of Nutrition Professionals conference last year and hit it off right away. I was so impressed with the work she was doing that I invited her to speak on season 1 of the Anxiety Summit.

methylation pathways

MTHFR interview from the Anxiety Summit – for your listening pleasure

I’d like to share that interview with you here, so you can get a taste of her level of expertise and for what she will be offering in the training. It’s yours to listen to whether or not you can attend the training and whether or not you’re a practitioner. Enjoy!

Are Your Genes Depressing You? MTHFR and Your Mood: Trudy Scott interviews Coleen Walsh on The Anxiety Summit

  • The Methylation Cycle overview, MTHFR and B vitamins as cofactors
  • How MTHFR effects the BH4 cycle and serotonin and dopamine
  • Factors that disturb methylation, how to test and what to do
  • Epigenetics and how SNPs are not our destiny

Listen to the recording here:

 

Learn more and purchase

Here is the link to read more about Coleen’s online MTHFR/methylation practitioner training on February 28th and to make your purchase:

http://www.easywebautomation.com/app/?Clk=5393326

Hope to “see” you there – I plan on attending this new training too!

PS. If you do purchase Coleen’s training do let us know by sending a copy of your receipt to support [at] everywomanover29.com and we’ll send you a copy of the transcript of the above audio interview as a nice little added bonus to help solidify your learning!

PPS. Coleen will also be giving a 3 hour training for the general public on March 7th, starting at noon MST. This event will break down the science even more, so that even an “everyday mutant” can follow the information. Details coming soon!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Cauliflower Garlic Bake

February 20, 2015

Cauliflower-Garlic-Bake-1

1 head of organic cauliflower
1 organic garlic head (yes it’s a lot of garlic but then I’m a bit of a garlic lover!)
3 T dried basil (or a handful of freshly chopped basil could also be used)
3 eggs, organic or pastured/free-range
2 T olive oil
1 T sea salt
1 T ground black pepper
½ cup grated organic mozzarella cheese (optional)

And another ½ to 1 cup grated organic mozzarella cheese for the topping (optional)

Butter to grease the casserole dishes (enough for 3 of them)

Chop the cauliflower finely (or place in a food processor) and steam until well cooked (about 15 minutes – longer than you’d typically steam it, so it’s quite soft). Once it’s soft, you may need to use a potato masher to get it really mushy and soft. Remove the garlic bulbs, peel and chop and add to the cooked cauliflower. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix together: dried or fresh basil, eggs, olive oil, sea salt, ground black pepper and grated mozzarella cheese (if dairy is not an issue).

Grease 3 casserole dishes with butter and pour/spoon the mixture into them so it’s about 1 inch (or 2.5 cm) deep – this will make sure it sets nicely and has plenty of nice and crispy stuff at the bottom and sides. It’s purely optional to add some grated mozzarella cheese on top too.

Here you can see how deep the mixture should be to get the crispy stuff at the bottom and sides.

Here you can see how deep the mixture should be to get the crispy stuff at the bottom and sides.

casserole dish

Here are the 3 casserole dishes I used – so you have an idea of size. The cup is just to give it scale.

Place the 3 casserole dishes into an oven that has been heated to 350°F (175°C) and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes until the mixture sets, the bottom/edges start to brown and the topping turns a nice golden color.

This makes a lot and the left-overs can easily be put in the fridge as is (covered of course) and heated up the next day in the same casserole dish at the same temperature (about 10-15 minutes seemed to work.

I love this recipe because you prepare once and get a super dish for at least 3 meals, plus there’s not a lot of washing of pots and casserole dishes to do.

This is a new recipe I created based on inspiration from another recipe I saw. I often do this – see something fun and yummy and tweak it to suit my needs and likes. Brad says it’s the best cauliflower he’s eaten and I must say that I feel the same way!

I hope you enjoy making it and enjoy eating it as much as we did!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

BOUGHT the movie – watch at no charge

February 20, 2015

bought

The movie that Big Pharma, the Vaccine Industry, the Medical Establishment and Big Ag DON’T WANT YOU TO SEE!

Watch it at NO CHARGE between February 20th – March 6th (details are below)

I’m thrilled to be able to share this incredible movie viewing with you. Jeff Hayes, producer of the new film BOUGHT, is a man on a mission, and he is making it available to view at no charge from February 20th-March 6th.

BOUGHT is a groundbreaking documentary that exposes the shocking truth behind drugs, vaccines and GMOs. It’s all about Big Food, Big Ag, and Big Pharma and is all about money and profits.

The movie subtitle is perfect: “Your health – now brought to you by Wall Street.”

Watch this film and hear from acclaimed experts in science, medicine, and the law, plus the activists who are raising awareness to help protect their families and will help you protect your family.

Big Pharma funding medical education

You may recognize Dr. Kelly Brogan MD., integrative psychiatrist. I interviewed her on both season 1 and season 2 of the Anxiety Summit. She talks about how Big Pharma funded her medical education. She shared how she was heavily courted by the drug industry and taken to first class restaurants. Of course, she questioned all of this and now educates her patients about real food, gut health, inflammation, curcumin, low vitamin B12 etc.

Shocking Paxil study 329

One of my favorite integrative doctors, Dr. Tami Meraglia MD., talks about the Paxil study 329. It found that suicide ideation tripled in adolescents who were on this antidepressant. The study authors omitted – yes omitted! – these parts from the study saying the adolescents were non-compliant, instead of reporting this as a side-effect! Had this been reported in the study, Paxil would not have been approved for use in adolescents.

A message of hope and empowerment

I love that it’s a movie with a mission and also with a message of hope and empowerment. It’s bringing these issues to light so we can make sure things get changed!  

Brad and I watched the movie earlier this week and we were riveted to our seats! I highly recommend it! You may not agree with everything and much of this is controversial (especially the vaccine information) but I encourage you to simply be open to listening to both sides.

Watch it at NO CHARGE

Just sign up to get access to the full video viewing – you’ll get an email with a link to watch it at your leisure http://www.boughtmovie.net/free-viewing?AFFID=197982

Save your spot, enjoy the video, and do tell others about it!

Addition 2/25/15: Let’s get this message out in a REALLY big way! 

  • Watch it and make a note of  1-3 things that made you go “Wow! I have to tell my sister/mother/husband/wife/best friend/daughter/son this right now!”  Also make note of the time elapsed (e.g. 13 minute mark)
  • For each of the 1-3 things/facts that made you go wow, come back and comment on the blog with each “wow fact” + the corresponding minute mark for each one. 
  • Here is an example: “Wow! Dr. Tami Meraglia – Paxil study – suicide ideation tripled in children – they omitted these parts from the study… 15 min mark”
  • This will inspire others to go and watch these sections and will give a great synopsis with minute marks each of us can go back to.

Win a copy of The Anxiety Summit

As a thank you, once the free viewing ends on March 6, I’ll do a drawing and 3 lucky winners will each win a copy of either season 1 or season 2 of The Anxiety Summit, 25+ hours of expert interviews on nutritional solutions for anxiety. If you already own a copy you’ll get a season 3 when it airs in May.

The 5 Love Languages for fabulous mental and physical health

February 13, 2015

lovelanguagebook

Without loving relationships, humans fail to flourish, even if all of their other basic needs are met.

Love is deeply biological.

It pervades every aspect of our lives and has inspired countless works of art.

Love also has a profound effect on our mental and physical state

The above are from The biochemistry of love: an oxytocin hypothesis published by The European Molecular Biology Organization.

With Valentine’s day coming up I’d like to share a wonderful resource for you to improve your loving relationships so you can truly flourish and see improvements in your mental and physical states.

It’s a book called The 5 Love Languages: The Secret to Love That Lasts by Gary Chapman, director of Marriage and Family Consultants.

This fabulous book will help you

single out your primary love language, what it means, and how you can use it to connect with your loved one with intimacy and fulfillment

And the great thing is that when you have your partner (and loved ones) do it too it will

benefit your partner [and loved ones] to know your primary love language in order to best express affection for you in ways that you interpret as love.

When I first heard what the 5 love languages were – Physical Touch, Quality Time, Words of Affirmation, Acts of Service and Receiving Gifts – I intuitively knew what my top ones would be. But it was still so helpful to do the 5 love languages online profile and read the book to get a really good understanding of it all! (If you’d prefer not to do the online quiz there is also one in the book itself)

As it says on the site:

The 5 Love Languages profile will give you a thorough analysis of your emotional communication preference.

The payoff of speaking each other’s love language is a greater sense of connection. This translates into better communication, increased understanding, and, ultimately, improved romance.

And, if I may add, fabulous mental and physical health!

In case you’re wondering about me, my top two are Physical Touch and Quality Time with Words of Affirmation a close third. Receiving Gifts was a zero for me!

I have to admit that learning that some people also don’t like Receiving Gifts was quite a relief to me. I’ve never been a gift person and always felt like it was kind of weird. Everyone likes getting gifts! Why don’t I? But now I know! I’ll take (and give) a big hug or spend quality time with Brad or my mom or sister before a gift!

Gary Chapman has written a number of books on the same topic but aimed at different audiences: for children, teens and even a one for the workplace. The book for the workplace is called The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace. I received a copy of this book at a recent business event and we all did the quiz. I was so impressed that I plan to use the quiz with folks that I work with so I can to show appreciation to my colleagues/team in ways that are meaningful to them.

Do let us know your love languages from highest to lowest ranking. And have your partner and loved ones do it too.

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Pyroluria and focal musician’s dystonia or musician’s cramp

February 6, 2015

guitar

In May 2014 a gentleman named Jay asked this question on my Pyroluria Questionnaire blog: “have you come across a connection between pyroluria and focal musician’s dystonia (musician’s cramp)?

I responded saying “I have not and until I looked it up I was not aware of this condition. I’m curious why you’re asking? Do you or someone you know have symptoms of pyroluria and focal musician’s dystonia?”

I’m a very curious person and always turn to the research and like to look for connections. I started to dig and came across the The Dystonia Society, a UK based organization that provides support, advocacy and information for anyone affected by the neurological movement condition known as dystonia. They have this definition on the About Dystonia page:

Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder. Faulty signals from the brain cause muscles to spasm and pull on the body incorrectly. This forces the body into twisting, repetitive movements or abnormal postures.

The various types of dystonia are listed and they discuss managing symptoms and say:

Remission from symptoms does sometimes occur but is rare – occurring in around 5-10% of cases.

I posted some feedback, starting a dialogue (both in the comments and via email) that led to me learning a whole lot more about dystonia and the finding out there does seem to be a connection to pyroluria, a social anxiety condition that is not well-recognized in the medical or mental health community. Symptoms include inner tension and discomfort in big groups. Many introverts relate to the symptoms of pyroluria too.

In the process Jay saw wonderful results, we heard from Dave and his success. And we’re getting to share this information in the hope of helping others like him and Dave.

Much of the information is buried in comments on various blogs so I’ve decided it needs a separate blog post – with the connections and research I discovered and some of the inspiring feedback from Jay and Dave.

This is most of what I originally posted (with a few slight revisions).

I do see some overlaps with dystonia and mood so it’s possible there is a connection between pyroluria and musician’s dystonia:

(1) The Dystonia Society is a wealth of information and has this on their mental health page: “it is now thought that people affected by dystonia are more likely to experience mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety and OCD even before the physical symptoms of dystonia appear. It is not known why this is – but it appears that whatever causes dystonia may also affect mood and behaviour in some way.”  Now I wonder how common social anxiety is for those with dystonia?

(2) “An additional relation between dystonia and mental health conditions is that some drugs used to treat psychoses can cause tardive dystonia / dyskinesia. With the new generation of these drugs (called dopamine receptor blockers) this is much less likely than it used to be – but unfortunately a small risk remains.” (this is also from the above dystonia page)

(3) The drug treatments they recommend are also often used for anxiety and depression. I’d suggest assessing for low GABA, low serotonin and low catecholamines first (using the amino acid questionnaire and determining if targeted individual amino acids may give the same relief. I would avoid benzodiazapines – Dr. Catherine Pittman shared the many side-effects and withdrawal effects during the Anxiety Summit.

(4) If you have pyroluria, you’ll also have low levels of zinc and vitamin B6, key co-factors in making serotonin and GABA and other neurotransmitters which affect anxiety and depression.

(5) Depression, anxiety, pyroluria and dystonia have a possible autoimmune/gluten/diet connection. This paper “Movement disorders in autoimmune diseases” discusses how “Tremors, dystonia, chorea, ballism, myoclonus, parkinsonism, and ataxia may be the initial and even the only presentation of these autoimmune diseases.” And here is a case study where the dystonia resolved on a gluten-free diet: “She had complete resolution of her neurological symptoms with introduction of a gluten-free diet.” We know gluten can damage the gut and lead to low levels of nutrients such as zinc and also cause low serotonin.

(6) Wilson’s disease (a serious condition of high copper/low zinc) can have symptoms of dystonia. This 2012 paper states: “The clinical manifestations of neurologic Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysarthria, dystonia, tremor, parkinsonism, ataxia, and choreoathetosis.”

I’m so pleased Jay asked this question. I learned a lot by looking in to this initially and since then have learned a great deal more.

And take a look at the fabulous results Jay and Dave saw when they implemented only the pyroluria protocol (the starting dose I use with clients is 100mg vitamin B6 and 30mg zinc and 1300mg Evening Primrose Oil):

From Jay in June 2014

I started taking B6 (Pyridoxine Hydrochloride) 120mg and Zinc USP 60mg 2 weeks ago and do find some relief already. As you may have guessed, I have had dystonia for a long time and had to put a professional musician’s career on hold, and when I read your site, I found that I have a large number of symptoms from your list – I am hopeful.

From Jay in September 2014

I think it is, at this point, safe to say that the pyroluria treatment is, at least in my case, the cure for pyroluria and dystonia. 90%+ of my symptoms have disappeared, I am working extensively on repertoire and I am thinking about getting back into performing.

Dave in September 2014

just writing here to say that i too have battled focal dystonia over the past 8+ years.  actually started as writer’s cramp and then worked it’s way into my guitar playing.  about  3 years ago i noticed symptoms lessened based on different things i ate and shortly after came across pyroluria.  in all questionairs i answer yes to most if not all questions.  

anyway,  for the past 2 years i’ve been on zinc and b6 and have had vast improvements.  for me, the muscle disorders don’t go away without retraining, but the b6 and especially zinc make retraining much more successful.   however, sometimes i do hit the jackpot and my hands work almost normal without the efforts of retraining.  my dose fluctuates between 25-60 mg zinc and 50-100 mg b6 which i seem to have more trouble taking.  i also experimented with methyl b12 but that led to a very painful rash.

the funny thing about all of this is that i feel nowadays that focal dystonia was only the canary in the coal mine for other symptoms that paid little or no attention to because i was only focused on being a musician.  as a result of taking supplements most of those other symptoms are much better and i’m soooooo close now to having proper movement in my fingers.

it’s really great to see what you and jay have posted here because it really validates what i’ve been doing.  i too believe there are many that can be helped by this.

Jay in October 2014

I am so happy to read this dystonia related success story! After my own experience, I still say an experience akin to rebirth as a musician and also as a person, this was the reason for me to post on this blog – to help get this out to musicians who are victims of dystonia and inadequate medical treatment.

We’re hoping we can generate some interest from various dystonia organizations/groups/forums and help more musicians find symptom resolution – certainly more than the 5-10% the Dystonia Society reports. The more people reporting success, the more likely approaches like this will be studied, accepted by the mainstream medical community and included on sites like the Dystonia Society.

If you relate to any of this please do comment and let us know what your results have been.

If you know someone with musician’s dystonia (or another form of dystonia) and pyroluria/social anxiety please do share this with them. 

 

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry

January 30, 2015
Home-made grass-fed burger, greens/basil, avocado, sprouts and cheese

Home-made grass-fed burger, greens/basil, avocado, sprouts and cheese

Psychiatry is at an important juncture, with the current pharmacologically focused model having achieved modest benefits in addressing the burden of poor mental health worldwide. Although the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a crucial factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that diet is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology, and gastroenterology. Evidence is steadily growing for the relation between dietary quality (and potential nutritional deficiencies) and mental health, and for the select use of nutrient-based supplements to address deficiencies, or as monotherapies or augmentation therapies.

I’m excited to share this groundbreaking publication, “Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry” which was published just last week in the mainstream journal Lancet. We have members of The International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research, also known as ISNPR to thank: Jerome Sarris, PhD, Alan C Logan, BA, Tasnime N Akbaraly, PhD, G Paul Amminger, MD, Vicent Balanzá-Martínez, MD, Marlene P Freeman, MD, Joseph Hibbeln, MD, Yutaka Matsuoka, MD, David Mischoulon, MD, Tetsuya Mizoue, MD, Akiko Nanri, MD, Daisuke Nishi, MD, Drew Ramsey, MD, Julia J Rucklidge, PhD, Almudena Sanchez-Villegas, PhD, Andrew Scholey, PhD, Kuan-Pin Su, MD, Felice N Jacka, PhD.

The abstract concludes as follows:

We present a viewpoint from an international collaboration of academics (members of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research), in which we provide a context and overview of the current evidence in this emerging field of research, and discuss the future direction. We advocate recognition of diet and nutrition as central determinants of both physical and mental health.

You may recognize some of these people from my prior writings and interviews.

Dr. Marlene Freeman is also the author of an editorial, Nutrition and Psychiatry, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in 2010.

It is both compelling and daunting to consider that dietary intervention at an individual or population level could reduce rates of psychiatric disorders. There are exciting implications for clinical care, public health, and research.

This is one of my favorite quotes! If you’ve ever heard me present I’m sure you’ll recognize it! This was in 2010 so we are making progress with getting nutrition recognized in the mainstream mental health world and I couldn’t be happier.

Here are a few select quotes from the new paper (which will shortly be released as an open-source document).

Mental disorders in general, and major depression and anxiety disorders in particular, account for a large burden of disability worldwide. Rapid urbanisation, and an overall transition from traditional lifestyles (concerning diet, physical activity, and social structures), which are some of the most pressing global and environmental issues of our time, have both been linked to increases in depression and other mental disorders

The mechanisms by which nutrition might affect mental health are, at least superficially, quite obvious: the human brain operates at a very high metabolic rate, and uses a substantial proportion of total energy and nutrient intake; in both structure and function (including intracellular and intercellular communication), it is reliant on amino acids, fats, vitamins, and minerals or trace elements.

The purpose of this Personal View is to provide a platform for robust debate in the specialty, particularly regarding the need to move towards a new integrated framework in psychiatry, whereby consideration of nutritional factors should be standard practice.

Diet and nutrition offer key modifiable targets for the prevention of mental disorders, having a fundamental role in the promotion of mental health. Now is time for the recognition of the importance of nutrition and nutrient supplementation in psychiatry. Nutritional medicine should now be considered as a mainstream element of psychiatric practice, with research, education, policy, and health promotion supporting this new framework.

This is so powerful! I commend the efforts of these authors and thank the researchers for all the groundwork which has led to where were are today…recognizing the very powerful connection between what we eat and how we feel. It’s exciting to be part of this movement!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Customizing a Low FODMAPS Diet for a Client with Anxiety and/or Depression

January 19, 2015

fodmaps-image

Here is an excerpt from a Dec 2014 paper called Review article: the aetiology, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence for food intolerance:

There have been significant advances in understanding the scientific basis of gastrointestinal food intolerance due to short-chain fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs). The most helpful diagnostic test for food intolerance is food exclusion to achieve symptom improvement followed by gradual food reintroduction. A low FODMAP diet is effective, however, it affects the gastrointestinal microbiota and FODMAP reintroduction to tolerance is part of the management strategy.

We’re seeing plenty of people with digestive issues like IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) and SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth),  often with accompanying anxiety and depression, and a low FODMAPS diet may need to be considered. How do we know if we should consider it and how do we help out clients make this change?

This webinar is a way for you to learn more about FODMAPS for your clients and it’s a way for me to showcase the valuable work my friend Julie Matthews is doing in her BioIndividual Nutrition™ program. And for us to share the very cool new Victus software. I’ve actually signed up for the next training and I’m just super-excited to get the word out…which is another reason for the webinar! When I learn, I like to share what I learn!

Customizing a Low FODMAPS Diet for a Client with Anxiety and/or Depression

A webinar for health practitioners – Wednesday January 21st at 3pm PST
Food Mood Expert Trudy Scott interviews Julie Matthews, co-founder of BioIndividual Nutrition Institute

In this webinar, aimed at health practitioners, we will discuss:

  • The scientific rationale for recommending a Low FODMAPS (an acronym, deriving from “Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) Diet for someone with anxiety/depression
  • Defining oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides); disaccharides (lactose); monosaccharides (fructose) and polyols (sugar alcohols and more)
  • What are high free fructose foods and the fructose malabsorption/anxiety and depression connection
  • How to do a low FODMAPs diet elimination/provocation
  • Why would you combine Low FODMAPS and SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) for SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth)
  • How the Victus software helps you create a diet/recipes for the Low FODMAPs Diet
  • How to learn more about Julie Matthews’ Bioindividual Nutrition program (for practitioners), other special diets and the upcoming study group

Julie Matthews is a Certified Nutrition Consultant specializing in autism spectrum disorders, ADHD, and nutrition for pregnancy.  Her approached is based on the BioIndividual Nutrition™ needs of each person. She provides dietary guidance backed by scientific research and applied clinical experience. Her award winning book, Nourishing Hope for Autism, has helped people around the world to make food and nutrition choices that aid the health, learning, and behavior of those with autism, ADHD, and other developmental delays. She presents at leading autism conferences in the US and abroad, and is the Nutrition Editor of the Autism File magazine. She is on the scientific advisory board for USAAA (U.S. Autism & Asperger Association) and the Autism Nutrition Research Center. She is the co-founder of Nourishing Hope and BioIndividual Nutrition Institute. Julie has a private nutrition practice in San Francisco, California, and supports families and clinicians from around the world with her nutrition learning tools and professional training courses.

Here is the link to register for the webinar. If you can’t make it at this time, register anyway to get a copy of the notes and audio:
https://az184.isrefer.com/go/lowfod/TrudyScott/

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

 

Pyroluria and chronic fatigue syndrome: is there a link?

January 16, 2015

tired-boyLast week I blogged about the social anxiety condition called pyroluria (Pyroluria, high mauve, pyrrole disorder, malvaria, elevated kryptopyrroles and social anxiety) and received some great comments on this and the other pyroluria blogs.

One question on this blog: The Anxiety Summit: How zinc and vitamin B6 prevent pyroluria and social anxiety was related to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/CFS so I’ve decided to share this and some additional information I was able to find.

Hi Trudy, I’m calling from Melbourne Australia, I was wondering if you have had any of your clients present with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as well as pyroluria. I have just recently been diagnosed with CFS, I also have ADHD. Someone on a CFS forum that I belong to told me about pyroluria and said it is common in ADHD and CFS sufferers. While the link between ADHD and pyroluria is well documented, I haven’t been able to find any information regarding a connection between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and pyroluria. I notice that there is an overlap of symptoms in the two conditions. I have all of the symptoms of CFS and many of the symptoms of pyroluria. I’m very interested in hearing your views about CFS and how it relates to pyroluria if at all. — Tom

I was not aware of a CFS/pyroluria connection until now but see there is some research showing how CFS and mood disorders/anxiety can have related causes and one of them is inflammation:

An intriguing and hitherto unexplained co-occurrence: Depression and chronic fatigue syndrome are manifestations of shared inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways

Low zinc is a factor in pyroluria and depression and of course we may also see low zinc in CFS:

Lower serum zinc in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): relationships to immune dysfunctions and relevance for the oxidative stress status in CFS

I find this paper very interesting since many of these same nutrients are commonly low in folks with anxiety and depression: Nutritional strategies for treating chronic fatigue syndrome

A detailed review of the literature suggests a number of marginal nutritional deficiencies may have etiologic relevance. These include deficiencies of various B vitamins, vitamin C, magnesium, sodium, zinc, L-tryptophan, L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, and essential fatty acids.

I’m surprised the above paper didn’t mention iron anemia.  This is very common with pyroluria.  This paper: Iron insufficiency and hypovitaminosis D in adolescents with chronic fatigue and orthostatic intolerance found this

In patients presenting with chronic fatigue and/or orthostatic intolerance, low ferritin levels and hypovitaminosis D are common

These are just a few of the links I found by doing a very quick pubmed search. There are likely many more.

Everything is so connected and inter-related! And it’s interesting how certain deficiencies can manifest in certain ways – one person may find themselves with a CFS diagnosis, someone else with arthritis and yet someone else with heart disease. I think we need to be thinking about addressing nutrient deficiencies, balancing biochemistry and getting healthy, perhaps more just than addressing a diagnosis.  

If you score high on the Pyroluria Questionnaire I would suggest simply addressing the pyroluria which may have some ripple down effects and actually improve the symptoms of CFS.

Now the next post will have to dig into the link between ADHD and pyroluria. Stay tuned.

In the meantime, I’d love to see your comments/questions if you can relate to any of this. Also, please do share in the comments if you know you have pyroluria and find the nutrients have eliminated your social anxiety and inner tension symptoms, and have also helped your CFS.

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Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”