2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference: Marc David shares

July 21, 2014

 

day 1The 2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference started today and I thought I’d share some gems from Marc David’s opening interview. Marc is the Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating and the host of the 2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference. He shared this:

My mission is to expand eating psychology so it’s for everyone
I have an inclusive approach and I have invited speakers and thought leaders with diverse viewpoints
I have invited people who care and who bring something special to their work

Marc says we need to handle eating challenges, emotional eating, body image issues, mood, digestion, immunity, fatigue etc. so “we can step forward into our greatness and give our gifts in this world”

Marc shared an example of 40 year old client who had digestive issues, was a binge eater, was constipated, had a low mood, got coughs and colds, needed to lose 20 lbs. She had tried everything and nothing worked. He looked at her diet which was extremely low in fat. He shared this “When you go low fat, binge eating is common.” When he said “You need to eat more fat, she had a horrified look. She had toxic belief that fat was bad for her. It’s an outdated belief but she had a fear of fat.” He had to work with her at a psychological level – suggesting a little bit of olive oil on her salad, eating an avocado and taking a fish oil supplement. She made the changes and she lost 14 lbs over the course of 3 months.

I really enjoyed his principles of “dynamic eating psychology” (a term Marc David coined):

  1. Food is a doorway and our relationship with food is a doorway to see what is there. He says “Stop fighting yourself and stop hating yourself and walk through the door and be a little curious. Insights will start to happen”
  2. Food is a great teacher. For example, I hate my job, I’m unhappy, something is out of balance.
  3. Every symptom has a deeper meaning and message
  4. You are here to heal – you could tweak someone’s diet and it can help, sometimes you need to do more
  5. Our life has a bigger purpose and higher calling – our eating challenges are here to move us in the right direction, help us get better and grow
  6. The more we can become personally empowered the more we can reach our metabolic potential. As you become the best possible person you can be, you have the best chance for the body to reach it’s potential.
  7. Food is love, energy, information and nutrition.

Marc says “We are banding together and bringing together experts to find a better way to eat.”

I am thrilled that I am one of the featured experts in the 2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference on July 21 – 26, 2014.

My interview plays tomorrow July 22 and is called: “The amazing amino acids for eliminating anxiety and emotional eating.” Could your anxiety and emotional eating be a brain chemical imbalance? And how do we address this with the amazing amino acids and other key nutrients

Join me, along with Marc David, as he interviews over 45+ experts in eating psychology, embodiment, weight, health, and nutrition. Get ready to hear some great insights and information that will advance your understanding of eating psychology and personal transformation in this one-of-a-kind virtual conference!

Here are a few gems from other speakers on day 1.

Dr. Mark Hyman, founder of the Ultrawellness Center, and author of the new book “The Blood Solution 10 day Detox Diet” shared this in his interview:

We have bought it hook line and sinker that we have to eat less and exercise more i.e. it’s your fault that you’re fat
The science now shows that all calories are not the same and certain foods are addictive
When we outsource our cooking to food corporations we will get sick. We have to learn how to cook. We have to eat real food! Eat an avocado – it doesn’t have a barcode on it and it doesn’t have an ingredient list. If something has an ingedient list it’s probably not that great for you!

Amy Pershing’s topic is “The Psychology of Binge Eating” and she shared:

Binge eating is not a willpower issue
Causes are profoundly varied – genetics, trauma, dieting, weight-related bullying, mood disorders like anxiety and depression
5 million adults 18 years and older ie 3.5 % of women and 2% of men, meet the criteria for BED (binge eating disorder)

You can sign up for the 2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference for FREE here: https://ipe.isrefer.com/go/2ndepoc/trudyscott/

Anna Clendening: Anxious Singer on America’s Got Talent 2014

July 13, 2014

anna clendening agt

Anna is a very talented 20 year old young woman who recently performed on America’s Got Talent 2014. Her singing was just beautiful and you could hear the raw emotion in her voice.

Being on this big stage was quite something for her – she’s been suffering from anxiety and depression since she was 16. A few months ago she was bedridden and having panic attacks. She said: “my mind had given up on me. I didn’t see a future. I didn’t want to be here anymore and I felt so bad about myself.”

She was able to turn things around dramatically with therapy and music.

During her audition, judge Howie Mandel shared: “I also suffer from an anxiety disorder – I have OCD.” He also said: “There isn’t anyone alive who doesn’t need help at some time and the world is here for you.” After her song, Howie was very kind and went and hugged her. He also said this: “life is filled with peaks and valleys, you have experienced a lot of valleys. Tonight, young lady, you are on a peak.”

I would have to agree and I’d like to say “bravo Anna!”  Watch her performance here….

I’ve got three other comments on this: the stigma of mental health, the wonderful effects of music for mood and encouragement to look in to the powerful effects of food and nutrients.

The stigma of mental health

I commend her for being open about her anxiety and depression. There is a great deal of stigma around mental illness but I had no idea how bad it was. I was very surprised to see all the cruel and insensitive comments on the youtube video. Here is one example:

Couldn’t leave her bed?  What a joke.  You didn’t see this kind this stuff 50 years ago.  It was called responsibility and accountability.  She was obviously validated and enabled by her parents.  Society today substantiates this crap.  It’s called life, and everybody has challenges and feeling they need to overcome, get over it.  I bet she’s drawing a nice little social security disability check, too. Its pretty sad that she has such self pity.  She is very attractive, talented, not overweight, racially advantaged, has loving parents.  She needs to visit a children’s cancer ward or burn ward and get a grip as to how truly blessed she is.  

I say this to Anna: “Just ignore these naysayers. You did good and the more of us who talk about it the more awareness we’ll bring.”

The wonderful effects of music for mood

In a 2009 paper called The effect of group music therapy on quality of life for participants living with a severe and enduring mental illness

A 10-week group music therapy project was designed to determine whether music therapy influenced quality of life and social anxiety for people with a severe and enduring mental illness living in the community. Ten one-hour weekly sessions including song singing, song writing and improvisation, culminated in each group recording original song/s in a professional studio.

This is what they found:

music therapy gave joy and pleasure, working as a team was beneficial, participants were pleasantly surprised at their creativity, and they took pride in their song.

A 2014 study called Possible benefits of singing to the mental and physical condition of the elderly, reported that the study participants felt:

refreshed, comfortable, light-hearted, relieved, and relaxed, they felt less tense and confused and their mood improved.  The level of cortisol, a salivary stress marker, decreased after singing.  The same tendencies were shown regardless of whether or not the subjects liked singing !  (this is my exclamation point)

I say this to Anna: “Good for you for finding music! I wish you all the best in AGT 2014!”

The powerful effects of food and nutrients

I would also like to encourage Anna and anyone with anxiety and depression to look in to the powerful effects of food and nutrients. Here are just a few of the topics we covered on the recent Anxiety Summit:

I say this to Anna: “I’d like to encourage you explore these and other biochemical approaches – so you can have zero anxiety and depression.”

And I say this to Howie: “I’d like to encourage you to also explore these and other biochemical approaches for eliminating your OCD.”  In this blog post about Charlize Theron I talk about how GABA, tryptophan, 5-HTP and/or inositol can end OCD and obsessive thoughts and behaviors.

I am musically “challenged” and can’t sing to save my life so while this is all very interesting to me, it’s not something I have experienced first hand.  I’d love to hear from you.  

Do you sing or play a musical instrument? How does it make you feel?  Does it help with anxiety, depression, stress?

Urinary neurotransmitter testing falls short

July 11, 2014

lab

I am often asked about urinary neurotransmitter testing and often a new client will come in with results from a test she/he has had done. I would like to share my thoughts on this rather controversial subject and say that I am not a fan and do not ever use this test. Let’s take a deeper dive into this topic.

The question

Here is a question I received right after the Anxiety Summit:

I have had good results using urinary neurotransmitter testing and targeted amino acid therapy and bioidentical hormones. I am able to see if all levels are low, indicating low stomach acid. I am also able to see if histamine or glutamate are high, indicating food hypersensitivities. I also use the levels for balancing and replacing. I know that Julia Ross is opposed to testing. What is your opinion and what did your other speakers [on the Anxiety Summit] say about this topic?

This is my answer:
I am very pleased that this person sees good results using urinary neurotransmitter testing and targeted amino acid therapy.

Why I am not in favor of this testing

However, I am not in favor of this testing for a few reasons:

1) Julia Ross is not in favor of it and having worked with her in her clinic for 2 years I respect her professional opinion and the results she saw when urinary neurotransmitter results didn’t correlate with amino acid questionnaire and trials of amino acids. Julia wrote a great article on this topic for the Townsend Letter and you can access this via the anxiety summit blog for her interview

2) Since leaving the clinic and starting my own practice, I’ve worked with folks who come in with urinary neurotransmitter test results that don’t always with correlate with amino acid questionnaire and trials of the amino acids. But I will be the first to admit that I have not done a thorough analysis of where they haven’t correlated simply because it didn’t seem worth my time.

3) I have heard some rather unpleasant stories from people who have had the urinary neurotransmitter testing done and have been given supplement recommendations based on the results. I just received an email recently from someone who said this:

I was doing xyz’s program last year and the aminos recommended based on urine neurotransmitter testing nearly sent me over the edge with extreme anxiety, insomnia and panic attacks. He had me take 300mg 5-HTP and 3000mg tyrosine a day, based on test results.

We know that anyone can have a bad reaction to supplements. But let me comment on this example: 5-HTP can raise cortisol and be stimulating for some people so it’s not something I recommend for everyone with low serotonin symptoms; 3000mg tyrosine a day is not excessive (1-2 x 500mg , 3 times a day is often typical) BUT will be too much if you don’t need it and can cause anxiety and insomnia.

4) A 2011 paper by Marty Hinz “Validity of urinary monoamine assay sales under the spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model” states that

No peer-reviewed published original research exists which demonstrates that these assays are valid in the treatment of individual patients in the clinical setting.

Low stomach acid and food hypersensitivities?

I’d like to also comment on two other parts of this question:

  • I am able to see if all levels are low, indicating low stomach acid.” I have not heard this correlation and would use other labs markers for low stomach acid – like total protein, globulin etc – and the person’s response to a HCl trial.
  • I am also able to see if histamine or glutamate are high, indicating food hypersensitivities.” I have also not heard of this correlation and would use an IgG test and food elimination and challenge to help figure out if someone has food sensitivities.

What do other speakers think?

It was also asked what other speakers on the Anxiety Summit said about this topic:

  • Other than Julia Ross, the only person who mentioned urinary neurotransmitter testing briefly was Dr. Anna Cabeca and we didn’t go deeper into the topic.
  • I did email Dr. Kelly Brogan and she said

I actually don’t use them. Occasionally I do serum amino acid testing (ION panel) but don’t feel that the science is there to support urinary neurotransmitter testing and feel that the reductionism around amino acids and behavioral translation is not consistent with my perspective and not needed for the outcomes I get.

If you listened to our interview on the Anxiety Summit, you’ll remember that Kelly doesn’t feel that low serotonin is a factor in anxiety and depression.

  • I will be following up with some of the other speakers like Josh Friedman, Hyla Cass, Amy Day and Corey Schuler.

What do Dr Weil and Nora Gedgaudas think?

I’d like to share some perspectives from a few others:

I checked with David Perlmutter, M.D., a neurologist colleague in Florida, about the accuracy of urine testing for neurotransmitters. He told me that neurotransmitters and their precursors are produced in abundance throughout the body and to assume that what is collected in the urine reflects what’s going on in the brain is a stretch.

Unfortunately Dr. Weil goes on to discredit salivary cortisol testing which has plenty of research supporting how effective it is!

  • Nora Gedgaudas, author of Primal Body Primal Mind states this on her site:

I have considered the urinary testing approach and was even enamored of the concept at first. Once I looked into the idea more closely, though, it just didn’t add up for me. I have been using amino acids now to address issues of mood, health and cognitive functioning for over 20 years. I have never used anything other than mood/symptomatic screening to guide amino acid supplementation. Results tend to be uniformly good to excellent. The sheer overwhelming complexity of amino acid/neurotransmitter activity in the human body/brain-and the compartmentalized nature of the biochemistry of each seems to best lend itself to a more functional and symptom-related evaluation. Lab testing simply falls short of the mark here.

I could not agree more with Nora’s comments. These are my exact thoughts. Here is the amino acids mood questionnaire I use with my clients. Based on symptoms we do amino acid trials and based on their response (which can happen as quickly as 5 minutes) we know if we’re on the right track.

I’ll be the first to say we don’t always have all the research to support what we do in the nutritional/integrative world and do agree that testing is extremely valuable but in this case I do not recommend urinary neurotransmitter testing as it does fall short in terms of accuracy and consistency.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences. Have you been tested and had good results? Bad results? Are you a health practitioner and say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to this testing?

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference

June 30, 2014

eating-pyscholgy-conf

I’m beyond thrilled to announce that I’m a featured expert in the 2nd Annual Online Eating Psychology Conference on July 21 – 26, 2014.

Join me, along with Marc David, Founder of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, as he interviews over 45 experts in eating psychology, embodiment, weight, health, and nutrition. Get ready to hear some great insights and information that will advance your understanding of eating psychology and personal transformation in this one-of-a-kind virtual conference!

I am a big fan of Marc David and the Institute for the Psychology of Eating and am truly honored to be included in this line-up of inspirational speakers. I’ve “attended” his past online summits and they are so enlightening. Also Marc is a fabulous interviewer who asks interesting questions and really gets you thinking!

My interview is: “The amazing amino acids for eliminating anxiety and emotional eating.”

Could your anxiety and emotional eating be a brain chemical imbalance? And how do we address this with the amazing amino acids and other key nutrients?

This is what we’ll be exploring on our interview:

  • The importance of optimal blood sugar balance and how glutamine is so powerful
  • The brain chemicals/ neurotransmitters and how they are related to anxiety and emotional eating
  • The tie in to low serotonin and also low GABA, symptoms and what to do: the powerful amino acids tryptophan and GABA
  • My favorite amino acid for comfort or reward eating: endorphigen (my clients call it a miracle amino acid)
  • My other favorite nutrients anxiety and emotional eating, and how they also help pyroluria and PMS: zinc, vitamin B6 and evening primrose oil

It really is time for a whole new understanding of our relationship with food. Obesity, overeating, body image concerns, emotional challenges with food, and diet-related health issues are with us more than ever.

People have abundant access to nutrition facts and information, but need to search long and hard for true healing wisdom. It’s time for an approach that honors all of who we are as eaters – body, mind, heart and soul.

Join us for an exciting time together as we explore leading edge thinking in the fields of eating psychology and nutrition. Get inspired by speakers from a variety of disciplines who have something unique and innovative to share.

Speakers include Dr Mark Hyman, Dr David Perlmutter, Paul Chek, Dr Hyla Cass, Amy Pershing, Dr Srini Pillay, Dr Frank Lipman, John Robbins, JJ Virgin, Tom Malterre, Dave Aprey, Dr Tom O’Bryan, Jon Gabriel, Dr Susan Albers, Sayer Ji, Donna Gates, Dr Alan Christianson, Jessica Ortner, Daniel Vitalis, Emily Rosen, Meghan Telpner, and many more!

Some topics include:
A Deeper Dive into Body Image
Neuroscience and Personal Change
A Holistic Approach to Eating Disorders
The Healing Power of Embodiment
Mindfulness based approaches to overeating
Sexuality and the Psychology of Eating
New insights into Weight
Culture, emotional health and metabolism
Hormones, Eating and Inner Health
The Gut-Psychology Connection
Spirituality and Nutrition
The Hidden Politics of Food
New Approaches to Nutritional Health
And much more…

Dates: July 21 – 26, 2014
Price: FREE
Where: Sign up online: https://ipe.isrefer.com/go/2ndepoc/trudyscott/

I look forward to seeing you in the conference!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

Eat fish and prevent anxiety, depression, inflammation and insulin resistance

June 27, 2014

 Stuffed salmon

How much wild fish is in your diet? Are you eating wild salmon or sardines two or three times a week? If you’re not, there are plenty of good reasons to start doing so!

Research shows “the likelihood of having depressive symptoms was significantly higher among infrequent fish consumers than among frequent consumers”

A 2011 study supports omega-3 consumption for mood disorders.

“DHA modulates some of the same genes targeted by current psychotropic medications, as well as increases myelin-related gene expression. Myelin-related gene expression decrease is a common, if nonspecific, denominator of neuropsychiatric disorders. In conclusion, our work supports the potential utility of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA, for a spectrum of psychiatric disorders such as stress disorders, bipolar disorder, alcoholism and beyond.”

A 2012 animal study shows that sardines lower insulin resistance and has other wonderful health benefits.

“these results support the beneficial effect of sardine protein in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome on such variables as hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and oxidative and inflammatory status, suggesting the possible use of sardine protein as a protective strategy against insulin resistance and related situations.”

I grew up in South Africa eating sardines and love them! I always have a few cans with me when I travel in case I’m stuck somewhere without a good protein source! Here is a blog post I wrote on: Healthy travel food ideas when you have food sensitivities.

Here is a great resource for making the best choices when it comes to seafood: “The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program helps consumers and businesses make choices for healthy oceans. Our recommendations indicate which seafood items are ‘Best Choices’, ‘Good Alternatives’ and which ones you should ‘Avoid’.”

A wonderful source for great quality fish is Vital Choice. They are “a trusted source for fast home delivery of the world’s finest wild seafood and organic fare, harvested from healthy, well-managed wild fisheries and farms.” I have met Randy Hartnell a few times and I love this company and everything that they stand for!

“We capture the fresh-caught quality of fine, sustainably harvested Alaskan salmon and other Alaskan and northwest Pacific seafood by cleaning and flash-freezing it within hours of harvest.

The fisheries that supply most of our seafood are certified sustainable by MSC (look for their blue logo) or the State of Alaska, or are widely considered sustainable.”

Enjoy some beautiful salmon for dinner or have a yummy sardine snack and see mood, blood sugar and overall health benefits!

YOU’RE WELCOME TO INCLUDE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEBSITE AS LONG AS YOU INCLUDE THIS COMPLETE BLURB WITH IT:

Trudy Scott (CN), Certified Nutritionist is the founder of www.everywomanover29.com, a thriving nutrition practice with a focus on food, mood and women’s health. Trudy educates women about the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients and helps them find natural solutions for anxiety and other mood problems. Trudy’s goal for all her clients (and all women): “You can be your healthiest, look your best and feel on-top-of-the-world emotionally!”

The Anxiety Summit: Rooibos – A Functional Food in the Management of Stress

June 26, 2014

amanda_swart rooibos

Amanda Swart, associate professor from the Department of Biochemistry at Stellenbosch University in South Africa was interviewed on the Anxiety Summit by host of the Anxiety Summit, Trudy Scott, Food Mood Expert and Nutritionist, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution.

Rooibos: A Functional Food in the Management of Stress

  • The role rooibos plays in the maintenance of normal cortisol levels
  • The influence of rooibos on cytochrome P450 enzymes
  • The polyphenols and flavonoids found in rooibos
  • Other health benefits of rooibos

I am such a research nerd, and I like to keep up with the latest research on anxiety and stress and mood. I immediately contacted the author when I came across this study, “Rooibos Influences Glucocorticoid Levels and Steroid Ratios In Vivo and In Vitro: A Natural Approach in the Management of Stress and Metabolic Disorders.” For you research nerds out there, this was published in March this year, 2014, in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.

Here are some great gems from my interview with Amanda:

The plant world is amazing, that’s where our medication comes from usually. The drug companies base most of their drugs on what is available in nature, and they just change structures a little bit.

If you can remember… back in the seventies and eighties, people weren’t really that stressed out yet. Stress is a very modern disease.

In the human study, they drank rooibos for six weeks, and they had six cups and they soaked the teabag for ten minutes. We didn’t see that cortisol levels decreased significantly, but what we did see is that the ratio of active to inactive was vastly improved.

If the ratio active cortisol to inactive cortisol is high, this is normally associated with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

Here is a link to the rooibos publications on Amanda’s ResearchGate site

Here is the prostate cancer study that Amanda discussed – how one of the adrenal androgens – 11 hydroxy androstenedione, may be implicated in castration resistant prostate cancer. (This in unrelated to rooibos consumption but Amanda’s rooibos cortisol work lead her to this work)

If you are not already registered for the Anxiety Summit you can get live access to the speakers of the day here www.theAnxietySummit.com

UPDATE: the summit concluded on Tues 6/24 – season 2 of The Anxiety Summit will be in November 2014. If you’d like to be on the notification list just sign up here www.theAnxietySummit.com

Missed this interview? Or want this and the other great interviews for your learning library? Purchase the MP3s or MP3s + transcripts + interview highlights and listen when it suits you

The Anxiety Summit: All the speakers and topics

June 25, 2014

food mood

The Anxiety Summit June 9-22, 2014.

Nutritional Solutions for anxiety, social anxiety, panic attacks and OCD.

Hosted by Trudy Scott, Food Mood Expert and Nutritionist, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution.

Here are all the speakers, their topics and blog posts with additional information, links to studies and more (missing blog posts will be added for each speaker)

Trudy Scott – Food Mood Expert, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution and host of The Anxiety Summit: “Anxiety: Stats, Trends and Gems from each Speaker”

This is the blog announcing the summit and week 1 speakers

Dr. Kelly Brogan M.D., Holistic women’s health psychiatry: “Misunderstood and Mistreated: Reinventing Psychiatry.”

Dr. Felice Jacka – Principal Research Fellow at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia: “The research: food for the treatment and prevention of anxiety and depression?

Esther Blum – Integrative Dietitian and bestselling author of Cavewomen Don’t Get Fat: “How to Live Gorgeously and Rock Your Inner Cavegirl”

Julie Matthews – Certified Nutrition Consultant and author of award winning book, Nourishing Hope for Autism: “BioIndividual Nutrition for Anxiety: How special diets and avoiding certain foods can Support individuals with anxiety.

Mira Dessy – Certified Nutrition Educator, Real Food Advocate, and author of The Pantry Principle: “How additives in your food can make you anxious.”

Amanda Swart – Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Stellenbosch University, South Africa: “Rooibos: a functional food in the management of stress

Dr. Stephanie Seneff – Senior Research Scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory: “How aluminum and Glyphosate (Roundup) collaborate to cause anxiety, depression, Autism and celiac disease

Margaret Floyd – Nutritional therapist, writer, real food advocate and author of Eat Naked: “Comfort food or sweet misery? How sugar controls your mood and how to get it out of your diet.

Julia Ross, MFT – Pioneer in the field of Neuro-nutrient Therapy and the author of the best sellers The Mood Cure and The Diet Cure: “Eliminating Anxiety: Amino Acid Therapy and Adrenal Balancing.

Dr. Hyla Cass – Board-certified in psychiatry and integrative medicine and the author of Natural Highs: “The Addicted Brain and How to Break Free.”

Dr. Josh Friedman, Psy.D., CHHC – Integrative Psychotherapist: “Integrative Psychotherapy: My Journey from Psychoanalysis to Whole Person Mental Health”

Trudy Scott – Food Mood Expert, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution and host of The Anxiety Summit: “How zinc and vitamin B6 prevent pyroluria and social anxiety

Dr. Anna Cabeca, DO – Gynecologist and Obstetrician, co-creator of Sexy Younger You: “The role of our hormones and neurotransmitters in anxiety”

Dr. Amy Day, ND – Specialist in stress, fatigue and Women’s hormonal issues: “Adrenal health for more energy, less anxiety and balanced hormones

Dr. Izabella Wentz – PharmD, author of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis: “Hashimoto’s And Anxiety.”

Corey Schuler, MS, DC – Board-certified nutrition specialist, chiropractic physician: “Roots, Leaves, and Vitamin Bs for Anxiety.”

Coleen Walsh – Functional Nutritionist, Master Nutrition Therapist, the “methyl queen”: “Are Your Genes Depressing You?: MTHFR and your mood.”

Catherine M. Pittman, Ph.D – Clinical psychologist, psychology professor, co-author of Extinguishing Anxiety: “Benzodiazepines in the Treatment of Anxiety: Weighing Risks and Benefits.

Dr. Nicole Beurkens, PhD – Licensed Psychologist, Certified Brain Injury Specialist: “Nutrition as a Foundation for Other Therapies.

Christa Orecchio – Clinical and holistic nutritionist, co-host of the nationally syndicated health talk show, “The Randy and Christa Show: “Preventing and Quelling Post-Partum Anxiety”

James M. Greenblatt, MD – Pioneer in the field of integrative medicine, author of The Breakthrough Depression Solution: “Integrative Therapies for The Treatment of OCD and Anxiety.”

Client success stories – Elizabeth and Carolyn. Two clients saw transformational changes in their mood and anxiety when they made food changes, added in nutrients, addressed digestive issues and food intolerances.

Robin Nielsen – Certified Nutrition Consultant and co-creator of Sexy Younger You: “Sleep Your Way to Better Moods

Meme Grant success story – Amazing Amino Acids for emotional eating and panic attacks

Trudy Scott – Food Mood Expert, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution and host of The Anxiety Summit: “Anxiety: coffee, chocolate, fish, water and more – and where to go next”

Thank you for joining us on The Anxiety Summit! I hope you’ll join us again in November for season 2 of The Anxiety Summit!

If you’d like to be on the notification list for season 2 just sign up here www.theAnxietySummit.com

If you are already on my list and stay subscribed you’ll get details about season 2 as we get nearer to the date.

Missed the summit? And want these incredible interviews for your learning library? Purchase the MP3s or MP3s + transcripts + interview highlights and listen when it suits you.

Remember don’t tolerate how you feel. You deserve to feel your absolute best, and you can and should feel on top of the world always. You can completely eliminate your anxiety symptoms. Don’t give up hope, and just keep looking for answers until you have zero anxiety ~ Trudy

 

The Anxiety Summit: BioIndividual Nutrition and Special Diets

June 22, 2014

julie matthews 1

[REPLAY on Monday 6/23 - ENJOY!]

This is day 3 of the Anxiety Summit.  Julie Matthews, Certified Nutrition Consultant and author of award winning book, Nourishing Hope for Autism, is interviewed by host of the Anxiety Summit, Trudy Scott, Food Mood Expert and Nutritionist, author of The Antianxiety Food Solution.

BioIndividual Nutrition for Anxiety: How special diets and avoiding certain foods can support individuals with anxiety

  • how the body and brain are connected
  • opiates, salicylates, amines, glutamates and oxalates
  • how special diets can help: GFCF, GAPS, low oxalate diet, FODMAPs
  • how to support biochemical pathways such as sulfation and methylation

Here are some great gems from my interview with Julie:

the brain is not this isolated island all by itself: it is connected to the body and all the biochemistry in the body affects what’s going on in the brain

different people might have similar biochemical pathways that are impaired, but they may manifest that differently – for some, with anxiety, some might have ADHD, some might have autism

gut flora is a really important factor in mood

I highly recommend Julie’s book Nourishing Hope for Autism: Nutrition and Diet Guide for Healing Our Children

And Julie shared this about her book and her work

My book is called Nourishing Hope for Autism, but a lot of people that have other conditions get my book, particularly because I call kids with autism the canaries in the coalmine. They’re the ones that are telling us that our world is too toxic, there’s too many stressors, it’s too deficient in nutrients, and we need to change our ways by adding more nutrition, more absorbable forms of supplements, getting supplements in general, eating good foods that are nutrient dense. These principles are principles that apply, in my experience, to almost all healing. So we learn a lot from the kids with autism on how it might apply to anxiety and other conditions.

We discussed the overlaps we see in autism and mood disorders: digestive issues, neurotransmitter deficiencies, gluten issues, low blood sugar, pyroluria etc.

Here is an article on Dr MacFabe’s work on gut bacteria: Spotlight on the Gut Bacteria-Brain Connection in Autism

Get your free gifts from Julie:

Using Food and Nutrition to Improve Autism and ADHD (includes info on some of the special diets even though title is about autism/ADHD)

Two hour oxalate interview and transcript (for Practitioners)

If you are not already registered for the Anxiety Summit you can get live access to the speakers of the day here www.theAnxietySummit.com

Missed this interview or can’t listen live? Or want this and the other great interviews for your learning library? Purchase the MP3s or MP3s + transcripts + interview highlights and listen when it suits you